Tag Archives: passover

A Passover Peep Show

peepspassover1By Marista Lane

This year for the first time, a Passover Peep show was entered into the Washington Post’s third annual “Peeps Show.” Over 30 dioramas made with traditional bunny and chick peeps marshmallow candies (normally considered an Easter tradition) were made for the contest. Number 32 on the slideshow is “A Very Peeps Passover” by Nycole Klein and Chris Patton of Chantilly, Va. Here’s what they said of their creation:

“Who says Peeps are just for Easter?” writes Klein. “Our Peeps have sat down to a traditional Passover Seder, complete with the requisite Passover Haggadah (prayer book), Seder plate, candles, matzo and lots of wine. As an added bonus, the Afikomen is hidden somewhere in the room!”

Number 20 on the slideshow is a creation of Bernard Madoff’s final day in his office, “Bernard Peepoff: The Game is Up” by Heather Kelly and Scott Fay of Berkeley, Calif., and Michael Mavretic of Washington D.C. Most of the dioramas are pop culture references and news stories. Tthe whole slideshow can be seen here.


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The Japanese Have Done It Again!

By Benjamin Schuman-Stoler

We know some families have struggled for centuries with the age old quandary of breaking a matzah in two perfect pieces. In my family, prizes range from winning the leftover brisket to a two-dollar bill for the one who can make the cleanest break.

Alas! Behold! The answer:

Now let’s see them try it with a shmura matzah…

“The sages probably did not intend this.”—Facebook Haggadah

facebook-haggadahBy Marista Lane

For those who can’t seem to pry themselves away from social networking long enough to enjoy a Passover Seder, there is hope! Yes We Conserve, a group on Facebook, created a satire of the Haggadah for the social networking obsessed: It’s designed to look like the homepage newsfeed on Facebook.

“Moses is Departing Egypt: A Facebook Haggadah” begins with an introduction, which cautions us that, “The sages probably did not intend this.” The story is set up in the format of the newsfeed and is told using popular Facebook features, including status updates, wall posts and gifts. The conclusion is especially awesome.

This year our ceremony still contains some time for reflection, and some ability to remain on the same topic for more than a minute or two.  But next year, may our ceremony be faster, divided into bite-sized chunks, and with each utterance no more than 140 characters.  And so we say together,

NEXT YEAR IN TWITTER


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Make Your Own Matzoh

By Nonna Gorilovskaya

My friend and cooking goddess Jenna Huntsberger never tasted matzoh before she decided to bake her own. (Note to self: I am a bad Jewish friend.) matzoh2She documented her valiant efforts on her ModernDomestic blog:

This recipe is from Rose Levy Beranbaum’s book, The Bread Bible, but the recipe is originally from Noel Comess, founder of Tom Cat bakery in Queens, New York. The recipe takes liberties with the original recipe for Matzoh, which is traditionally made from plain flour and water. Beranbaum adds olive oil for crispness, and salt, wheat flour and rosemary for flavor. According to Jewish law, the dough must be baked 18 minutes after the dough is mixed, otherwise it is considered “leavened” and unsuitable for Passover. But Beranbaum’s dough rests for a full 30 minutes before shaping…

While this matzoh is not strictly kosher for Passover, it is a recipe well worth adding to your year-round baking arsenal. The flavors are earthy and satisfying, with the rosemary and salt adding a savory punch to the simple dough.

Jenna liked matzoh so much that it might make a cameo on her Easter dinner plate. Click here for Jenna’s adaptation of Beranbaum’s Mediterranean matzoh recipe.


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The Google Seder

By Nadine Epstein

The e-mail invitation came at the last minute. Not that Google didn’t know Passover was on its way, but apparently it would have been un-Google-like to plan too far in advance. So the message arrived just a few days ahead of the special evening: “I would like to formally announce this year’s Google seder, affectionately known as Koogle@Google 2008.”

“Google? seder? Google seder?” you might ask. Not many companies (I can’t think of any others) have an official corporate seder. We’re not talking a Hanukkah or Christmas party but a full-fledged Exodus commemorative night at Google headquarters in Mountain View, California, a few miles south of Palo Alto, in the heart of Silicon Valley. Continue reading